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Do you agree that timing rules for digital and non-digital services should be aligned?

Timing rules

The Tax Administration Act 1994 sets out a range of rules by which various returns must be received, payments made, and other things must be completed. These rules were typically designed to deal with paper-based transactions. These timing rules would need to be reviewed to ensure that the requirements for the use of digital services are clear, and that there are no timing benefits to customers in using non-digital compared with digital services.

Do you agree that timing rules for digital and non-digital services should be aligned?

Comments

michele hunt
there should be a move to alignment as long as those without digital access are not penalised by this and also the government has to take in to account the move to postal delivery only 3 times a week outside of rural areas

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1 year ago
Tevai Barr
I do agree with the above comment, that the government do need to take the rural delivery into consideration. My little concern about digital though is that, some farmers do get their pay cheque from Fonterra don't always receive their funds in their account on the 20th, so therefore, farmers who are doing their payments online are predating their outgoing payment for the 21st of each month for PAYE, just to say, where in some case, farmers do get caught up with little late fees as such, where inland revenue's system automatically bill the farmers for late penalty. I have experience this and I don't think it matters that much especially where our account shows that funds from our account was direct debited into inlands account on the 21st. Some staff are helpful and some just through the book at you if the payment is on the 20th its got to be the 20th. Unless these issues are dealt and proper handled, I would say its good that new Zealand is going forward and the government is looking at these sort of thing, but please do look at the little things that ird workers don't think it matters.

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1 year ago
George Spark
Well there's a delay of a day or two for postal mail to work its way through the system. However if the real question is "should we shorten the time people have to file non-digital returns to annoy them for not using digital", I don't think there's a point in that. At the moment, with GST for example, we have about a month after the end of the tax period to file the return (whether manually or digitally). I think a month is fair for monthly/bi-monthly returns, and longer for annual returns, should these be retained (as opposed to fully shifting to a monthly tax system). So my answer is no: there's no reason to align them in as far as they are not already, as the delay caused by postal mail is negligible.

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1 year ago
Kevin
Keep it simple - due by a date is just as it says! But if a paper version arrives a day or two late who cares? Make the due dates the same for simplicity and get on with it.

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1 year ago
C Waters
You can try and align items but for those who have no access to digital the process already doesn't work due to the huge delays in getting paper around the country. NZ Post regularly take more than a week to get a piece of paper to my letterbox, and a further week to get the completed piece of paper back to IRD. And my dial up speed internet is $16 a gigabyte with an absolute maximum of 6 gig a month.

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1 year ago
Chris Peace
Yes, conceptually. But I'm often away from home office working with little or no time to do returns and, sometimes, no secure broadband access. Thus, people like me would need some latitude in filing returns

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1 year ago
Taoufik Elidrissi
when digital and non digital is aligned then it gives choices/flexibility to customers in case digital technology fails.

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1 year ago
Carsten Schousboe
I honestly don't mind. But that is because I assume I'll be able to go digital easily. NZ Post isn't exactly getting faster so It'll matter for people who can't go digital. The principled approach is probably best.

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1 year ago
wendy
One cannot properly answer these questions without thinking through the legal implications. We are not all law firms and the ordinary business or man on the street cannot function like a law firm. These questions are mischievous. The solutions need to be user-friendly, open, honest , fair and transparent. No pressure being the guiding principle.

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1 year ago
maygray
without knowing what the consequences of this would be we cannot possible answer this question with any certainty. Again I fear that if you don't have digital then you will be at a disadvantage at having to pay higher postage fees or something. Furthermore what will be the consequences for tax payers of this change? What will the control mechanisms be?

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1 year ago
Phillip de Bruyn
Simplify the tax system by having a consumption tax and only a consumption tax. Minimal exceptions and no claiming back of any taxes.

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1 year ago
Dwayne
Offline forms can still be sent by fax so IRD should maintain the old fax numbers, again as a fallback option for those who need it. Whether or not post takes longer, you can still see the postmarked date on the envelope and theres no point taking an inflexible attitude to deadlines if the return can be sent within a week or so regardless of how its done.

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1 year ago
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